T H E   C H I P P Y   C H I C K S


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J U L I E   P I A Z Z A

Owner and Co-founder, Dreamer

Then, they will graft the skin, patch-like, back on. With any luck, the new skin will take, and Wrobel will begin to make the missing protein. There is something, she admits, particularly sci-fi about the whole process, something otherworldly and reptilian. “My cousin and I were laughing because he goes ‘it would be cool to know someone who’s genetically modified,’” Wrobel said. “And I’m like, ‘oh thanks, I’m going to be this genetically modified, bionic person.’”

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S T E L L A   N O V A C K

Owner and Co-founder, Boss Mom

This summer, Rachael Wrobel hopes to grow a second skin. It will start from the skin cells contained in a biopsy, harvested by Stanford dermatologists. Carefully stewarded, those cells will divide and grow, laboratory-spun into fragile, new-skin sheets. The dermatologists will tinker with the skin’s fine machinery, adding a missing genetic ingredient: type-7 collagen, a protein that Wrobel’s body does not produce.


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K A R Y N   P

Handy Chick + Stylist

Wrobel is a brassy 28-year-old, a straight-shooting Midwesterner who works full-time providing respite care to developmentally disabled adults. She’s five foot zero, 95 pounds, and her personality is packed like dynamite sticks into her tiny body. “Everybody’s surprised,” she laughed, “because they don’t expect someone so small to be that scrappy.”

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A S H L E Y   H

Webmaster

Wrobel is a brassy 28-year-old, a straight-shooting Midwesterner who works full-time providing respite care to developmentally disabled adults. She’s five foot zero, 95 pounds, and her personality is packed like dynamite sticks into her tiny body. “Everybody’s surprised,” she laughed, “because they don’t expect someone so small to be that scrappy.”